WTM Wine 101 | Grape Pomace / by Adnan Saribal

Adnan Saribal works as a wine ambassador alongside a two-Michelin-star chef at a Spanish restaurant in one of Istanbul's most prestigious five-star hotels. He also enthusiastically shares his knowledge of wine on social media through his Wine Education page on Instagram.

Soaking the pomace in water

Soaking the pomace in water

Throughout the growing season the grape struggles on the vine to bring us that most enjoyable and complex of beverages. Wine. Most of us are probably unaware that the grape harvest provides much more. The final gift of the growing season is grape pomace. This is the post-pressing residue that consists of grape skin, seeds and a small percentage of stems. Pomace is not really a waste product. It is employed to produce a wide variety of other products.

Grape skin

Grape skin

The Ancient Greeks and Romans made a bitter wine called Lora, by soaking the pomace in water. This ancillary beverage was generally served to slaves, though lower class citizens and even soldiers may have had access to wines that were only marginally better. [1] Today, the French make a similar style of wine called piquette or simple wine.

Other uses for grape pomace include a post-harvest return to the soil as fertilizer in the vineyard, so that all of the minerals are put back into the earth. Feed for livestock is another common method of recycling grape pomace. It can be distilled for production of pomace brandy like Italian Grappa, Spanish Orujo, French Marc or Chilean Pisco. Pomace is a common antioxidant used in cosmetics. It can be repurposed for culinary use and pressed to make grape seed oil or ground into grape seed flour.  You might also encounter it as part of a grape-spa treatment. So beyond the most obvious use in wine production, you may encounter pomace in a variety of other areas. Be thankful for the grape and all that it brings us. Cheers!

Source: [1]* http://www.unrv.com/economy/wine-chart.php